Soul Food

September 19, 2021 in Uncategorized | Comments (0)

image_pdfimage_print

Think on These Things: Positive thoughts in a negative world…

I’m sure you’ve heard the story about an old Cherokee teaching his grandson about life, but it is worth repeating. The old man said, “There is a fight going on inside of me between two wolves. One is evil. He is anger, envy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego.”

He goes on to say, “The other wolf is good. He is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion, and faith. This same fight goes on inside of everyone, even you.”

The young boy thought a moment, then asked, “Which wolf will win?”

The grandfather replied, “The one you feed.”

This same battle goes on inside of all of us. Unfortunately, too many people today have chosen to feed the wrong wolf. The result is uncontrolled hatred and anger which makes for difficult relationships.

Uncontrolled hatred can lead to blind rage. Uncontrolled anger can cause us to take our frustrations out on others. Arguing becomes all about wanting others to believe we are right,  whether we are or not. Debating is all about winning, not about truth. Finding two people with different points of view who can dialogue or have a give-and-take conversation with respect is rare indeed. Our approach depends on which of our inner wolves we are feeding. 

I must admit that I think the world would be a much better place if everyone just agreed with me and did things my way, but they don’t. How does this make me feel? Angry? Bitter? Upset?

God created us to be different. We have different eyes and hair, shapes and sizes, backgrounds and environments, likes and dislikes. It would be reasonable to assume that we have different points of view and opinions. That’s why God deals with us as individuals. However, we must always remember that what God thinks is more important than what we think. So we must constantly feed on His Word to win our inward battle.

Our very being needs to be filled with God’s love. People guided with God’s love speak gently and with kindness. They say, “There but for the grace of God go I,” instead of adopting an “I’m holier than you” attitude.

God’s Spirit is one of cooperation not division. Those filled with God’s Spirit want to be a part of the solution, not just point out the problem. They want to work for the betterment of the whole, not just for what pleases them.

Therefore, we must feed on…

  • …compassion and kindness (1 Peter 3:8).
  • …humility and patience (Ephesians 4:1-3).
  • …peace, encouragement, and edification (Romans 14:19).
  • …avoiding strife and respecting others (Philippians 2:1-5).

God’s Word is full of tasty morsels to help win the battle waged inside us for our soul. Our relationship with God, Jesus Christ, and the Holy Spirit is the best soul food we can have to face the challenges of each new day.   

*****

“Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.” ~Philippians 4:8 (KJV)


Must We Always Be Right?

September 12, 2021 in Uncategorized | Comments (0)

image_pdfimage_print

Think on These Things: Positive thoughts in a negative world…

Ephesians 4:3 says, “Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace.” This is easier said than done. However, if everyone would just agree with me and do things my way, we could be unified and peaceful. My friend disagreed. She felt unity could only be achieved if everyone agreed with her and did it her way. What a dilemma—and one the world faces daily because everyone is right in their own eyes.

Is our zeal to prove we are always right hindering our relationship with others and even God? How important is it to always be right?

For example, let’s say you are driving down the road and another car is coming towards you. Both of you are in the same lane. You have a right to be in that lane and the other car doesn’t. However, the other car has no intention of changing lanes. Neither do you. In fact, you are adamant about your right to be there. So a head-on collision occurs and both drivers die. Yes, you were right. You might say you were “dead right!” But who cares? You’re dead.

Must we always be “right at any price,” leaving a trail of hurt and sorrow in our wake? Are we overly aggressive and quarrelsome? Do we win the argument, but lose the friend? If so, we might be in danger of being “dead right!”

Or are we peacemakers? The Bible doesn’t say, “Blessed are the belligerent”—it says, “Blessed are the peacemakers for they shall be called the children of God” (Matthew 5:9). Perhaps qualities like humility, gentleness, patience, kindness, and meekness might help us get along better with others, more than a “my way or the highway” attitude.

There may be times when we should stand up, stand up for Jesus but if we are honest with ourselves, most of our conflicts are over trivial matters. The Bible tells us to avoid foolish and ignorant disputes because they generate strife. A servant of the Lord should not quarrel. They should be gentle to all, exhibiting patience and humility (2 Timothy 2:23-26).

What is our goal in dealing with others? Do we want to change them and their point of view? Do we want to promote our thoughts and ideas? Or do we want to pray about it, and open ourselves up to the guidance of the Holy Spirit? Our job is to love people, not try to change them. That’s God’s job. We need to be asking God to change us and our approach, not the other guy.

So with that in mind, I’ve made a major decision. The next time my husband tells a story to others and gets a few peripheral facts wrong, such as what time of day it was or the color of someone’s hair, I’ve decided to smile and say, “You might be right,” instead of constantly correcting him. Sometimes it’s better to have peace than always be right.  

*****

Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.” ~Philippians 4:8 (KJV)


Not Good Enough

September 5, 2021 in Uncategorized | Comments (0)

image_pdfimage_print

Think on These Things: Positive thoughts in a negative world…

When my grandfather was dying several years ago, I went to spend a week with him in the foothills of the Ozarks in southeast Missouri. He was in his late 80s and had lived a long, peaceful life. Everyone called him Uncle Doug and he was well-respected in his farming community. He was a gentle man who became a Christian at a young age. He was a deacon who went to a little Baptist church every Sunday where he taught Sunday school for decades. He helped strangers and neighbors alike, and never said one unkind word about anyone. When I say never, I mean never—not even in the privacy of his own home.

When my grandmother died during a pneumonia epidemic, my grandfather promised her he would never remarry. I’m not saying that was a wise thing to promise, but to illustrate the level of integrity my grandfather had, he never remarried in those 60 years after her death. He had every little widow lady in the county chasing him, but he never remarried because his word was his bond.

People said if Uncle Doug said something was so, it was so. And at his funeral I heard not one but several people say, “Well if Uncle Doug doesn’t make it to heaven, there is no chance for the rest of us.”

They would be surprised to know that when I spent that week with my grandfather, I came into his room and found him crying. Thinking he was ill, I asked what I could get for him. What did he need? Did he need pain medication? No—he was crying because he felt like he was a sinner. He hadn’t done enough for God. He wasn’t good enough to meet his Maker.

Now some might say, “How sweet! He was such a humble man.” Yes, he was humble. He was so humble he didn’t even realize how God had worked through him to touch the lives of others, including mine. I think that’s a wonderful thing. However, I found it quite sad for him to be facing the end of his life feeling God was displeased with him because he wasn’t good enough. I don’t think that’s where our focus should be because in some twisted way it becomes all about us instead of all about God. It is because Jesus lives in us that we can rest in peace. I prayed for God to give my grandfather peace and He did.

Unfortunately, many do not understand that it’s not about our goodness—it’s about God’s greatness. It’s Jesus living in us that gives our life value (Galatians 2:20). We can never be good enough to earn God’s love, so He freely gives it to us (Romans 5:8). If we could be good enough, we wouldn’t need God.

*****

Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.” ~Philippians 4:8 (KJV)


Reflecting Christ

August 29, 2021 in Uncategorized | Comments (0)

image_pdfimage_print

Think on These Things: Positive thoughts in a negative world…

People make a huge error thinking that Christianity is a religion. It’s not so much a religion as it is a lifestyle, one that reflects Christ living in us. Religion is what you believe, but Christianity is what you live. It’s something you do. So being a Christian requires more than just belief.

When people become followers of Christ (i.e., Christians), their lives are no longer their own (1 Corinthians 3:23). They automatically become witnesses (Acts 1:8). Others look carefully at the Christian lifestyle, so Christians are actually witnessing for Christ whether they want to or not. We Christians have quite a responsibility. What kind of witnesses are we?

Christians are the salt of the earth (Matthew 5:13). Are we full of zest for the life we are called to live?

Christians are the light of the world (Matthew 5:14). Do we light a candle in this world or do we curse the darkness?

Christians are friends of Christ (John 15:13-15). Do we understand the meaning of friendship in our relationships? Can we keep a confidence?

Christians are not under the law but under grace (Romans 6:14-15). Do we know when to make an issue out of something and when to let it pass?

Christians are partakers of the sufferings of Christ (2 Corinthians 1:2-8). How do we handle trials when they come our way? Christians aren’t promised a life without thorns or thistles.

I’ve heard it said that one reason people do not become Christians is because they know one. By the same token, the main reason they do become Christians is because they know one. Which kind of Christian am I? How do people feel when they are around me? What do people see when they look at me? I’m not talking about perfection but reflection.

When we look in a mirror do we see wrinkles? Baggy eyes? Double chins? Scars? God doesn’t see that and He wants us to see what He sees—a reflection of Himself (2 Corinthians 2:15-16). We want to reflect the fruit of the Holy Spirit, not the works of the flesh (Galatians 5:19-25). When people look at us, we want them to see a glimmer of Christ in us.  

Professing to be religious is not enough. Saying we love God but not showing it to our neighbors puts us on dangerous ground (I John 4:20). On the other hand, doing something for others is the same as doing it for God (Matthew 25:24-46). Christians walk the walk, not just talk the talk. To reflect Christ in our lives, we need a little less talk and a lot more action.

*****

Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.” ~Philippians 4:8 (KJV)


The Word of God

August 22, 2021 in Uncategorized | Comments (0)

image_pdfimage_print

Think on These Things: Positive thoughts in a negative world…

The Bible is God’s Word. I’m not sure we really understand what a blessing it is to have God’s Word readily available to read. We don’t have to wait for Moses to come down from a mountain with a tablet of stone to hear what God has to say. We don’t have to wait for Paul’s next parchment epistle to arrive via messenger. We have access to God, His thoughts, and His example at our fingertips. I wonder if we really appreciate what a privilege that is.  

In biblical times, the average person did not have access to a Bible. Only the religious leaders had a copy of the Bible and probably not in total. That’s why public reading of Scripture was important. Paul refers to this in Timothy 4:13 when he says, “Till I come, give attendance to reading, to exhortation, and to doctrine.” 

In those days, people weren’t just grabbing their Bibles and heading over to Joe’s house for an impromptu Bible study. Many at that time were illiterate. When the Bereans were commended for searching Scriptures daily, they were making an effort to get together with someone who could read and had access to portions of the Bible (Acts 17:11). Reading or studying the Bible was a shared activity with people supporting and encouraging one another.

Once the Bible was canonized, emperors like Constantine sanctioned that Scriptures could be copied by hand by scribes. Canonization is just a fancy way of saying the community of churches or God’s people all got together and, through much prayer and discussion, decided which biblical writings were divinely inspired and authoritative.

Copying these Scriptures was a huge, laborious undertaking. Each word had to be carefully formed in ink with no room for error since there was no “wite-out” or “correct-o-type” available. During the Middle Ages, around 600 to 1400 AD, several thousand monasteries were established across Europe to copy the Bible. Teams of scribes and artists produced magnificent parchments filled with beautiful artwork. Most people in the Middle Ages were illiterate, so these pictures, designs, and illustrations were very popular. These Bibles were huge and expensive—not available to the common man—so they would be put on display at some churches, monasteries, and universities.   

However, after the printing press came along in the 1400s, the floodgates opened and information became available to ordinary, everyday people. The printing press was actually the Internet of its time. Eventually literacy and access to books became widespread. The Bible became accessible to the average person—people like you and me.     

When John introduces us to Jesus in the New Testament, he refers to Him as the Word. “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God” (John 1:1-4, 14). How appropriate for Jesus to be called the Word, for Jesus is indeed the Living Word of God. Jesus tells us that if we abide in His Word, we are truly His disciples (John 8:31). This has a two-fold meaning because not only are we to abide in God’s Word, we are to abide in Jesus.   

God’s Word is vital to our Christian journey. It reminds us of who Christ is, what He has done for us, what He continues to do for us, who we are in Christ, and how we should live our lives. What a privilege it is to have the Bible, God’s very Word, at our fingertips! 

*****

Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.” ~Philippians 4:8 (KJV)


Poetry in Motion

August 15, 2021 in Uncategorized | Comments (0)

image_pdfimage_print

Think on These Things: Positive thoughts in a negative world…

I’ve always enjoyed reading and writing poetry. Poetry allows us to experience ideas with creative imagery. Did you know that about 30% of the Bible was written in poetic form? Whole books such as Psalms, Proverbs, and Job are poetic. Much of Old Testament prophecy is in poetic form. What isn’t written in poetic form in the Bible still has many elements of figurative language such as similes and metaphors.   

Both similes and metaphors are used to make comparisons. Similes use the word “like” to make a comparison. An example would be: life is like a box of chocolates. Metaphors just state the comparison. An example would be: all the world’s a stage.

I enjoy reading modern translations of the Bible such as The Message, but I also love the imagery displayed through metaphors when reading the King James, New King James, or the New International Version. I think God uses metaphors to reach out to each one of us, making it easier to identify with Him individually. The Bible is full of such metaphors. Here are a just a few examples:

  • To the architect, Jesus is the chief cornerstone (1 Peter 2:6).
  • To the astronomer, Jesus is the Sun of righteousness (Malachi 4:2).
  • To the builder, Jesus is the firm foundation (Isaiah 28:16).
  • To the carpenter, Jesus is the door (John 10:7).
  • To the geologist, Jesus is the Rock of Ages (1 Corinthians 10:4).
  • To the farmer, Jesus is the Lord of the harvest (Luke 10:2).
  • To the jeweler, Jesus is the pearl of great price (Matthew 13:46).
  • To the herder, Jesus is the Good Shepherd (John 10:11).
  • To the singer, God is the song (Isaiah 12:2).

This list barely scratches the surface. Throughout the Bible, we find a loving God reaching out to us, breaking down barriers, and trying to give each of us things we can identify with—examples we can relate to that lead us to Jesus. It doesn’t matter what our occupation is, what our interests are, or what we are going through—there is something in the Bible we can identify with. God must love us very much to go to this much trouble.

In my personal life, I take it a step further. I imagine God saying, “Come let’s take a walk. You and I have a lot in common. Those flowers are certainly fragrant today. Did you know I am the Rose of Sharon?  Look at that lovely stream. Did you know I can give you living water to drink and you will never thirst again? Are you getting hungry? I never get hungry, but I would enjoy eating with you. Did you know I am the Bread of Life?” (Solomon 2:1; John 4;10; John 3:65)  

When I’m sick I imagine God sitting with me saying, “Don’t fret. Did you know I am the Great Physician? You need a little rest if you are going to get better and I am the giver of rest. Things look dark for you now but I am the Light in this dark world.” (John 8:22; Matthew 11:28; John 8:12)

I love thinking about Jesus being with me. No matter what I’m doing or what I’m going through, He is there. These metaphors help me see Christ in my life all the time. When my time on earth is through, Christ will be with me, whispering in my ear, “Do not fret, little one. I love you. I am the resurrection and the life” (John 11:25).

*****

Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.” ~Philippians 4:8 (KJV)


Father, Hold My Hand

August 8, 2021 in Uncategorized | Comments (0)

image_pdfimage_print

Think on These Things: Positive thoughts in a negative world…

The Bible continually refers to God as our heavenly Father and us, as His children. I love what God tells us in Isaiah 41:13: “For I am the Lord, your God, who takes hold of your right hand and says to you, ‘Do not fear. I will help you.’”

Fathers exude an aura of protectiveness to their children. When toddlers are learning to walk, they want to hold their father’s hand to steady their uneasy steps. Preschoolers tend to be a little braver, so a father will demand his hand is held to keep children from wandering away, getting lost, or darting out in front of traffic. His hand gives a sense of security.

As children grow up and show a certain amount of wisdom, they might be allowed to venture out more on their own. Still they know that a steady hand of guidance is there when needed.

Of course, there are times when teens or young adult children think they know so much more than their father. Eventually, as they grow in maturity, they realize dad knew quite a bit more than they thought. As Tim Russet said, “The older I get, the smarter my dad seems to get.”

Those who had loving fathers find it easier to view God as loving, merciful, and kind. Unfortunately, not all fathers are that way. Some were too busy to be bothered with their children, never around, or even abusive. Our heavenly Father can transcend those negative memories because our spiritual Father is never too busy for us. He is always available and willing to give us His undivided attention. His thoughts are only for our best. He will never abandon or forsake us (Hebrews 13:5).

We are all children at heart. We all have times when we need someone to hold our hand. If we put our hand in our heavenly Father’s hand, He will hold it. He will help us. He will steady our uneasy steps. He will keep us from getting lost. He may lead us on a path that appears hazy, but there’s no need to worry. He knows the way. He will calm our anxieties. He will comfort our pain. He will keep us secure. 

All we have to do is say, “Father, hold my hand” and He will! God is continually with us and will gladly hold our hand if that’s what we want. No need to fret. No need to fear. As He holds our hand, He counsels and guides us—and when the time comes, His loving hand will take us to eternal glory (Psalm 73:23-24).

*****

“Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.” ~Philippians 4:8 (KJV)


Who Are You?

August 1, 2021 in Uncategorized | Comments (0)

image_pdfimage_print

Think on These Things: Positive thoughts in a negative world…

Once, Jesus asked His disciples, “Whom do men say that I am?” Some said He was John the Baptist, some said Elias, some said a prophet, and so on. Jesus was no doubt curious.

When Jesus asked Peter, he replied, “You are Christ, the Son of the living God” (Matthew 16:13-17). It pleased Jesus that Peter realized this. After all, Christ knew who He was even if those He came in contact with weren’t quite sure.

How about us? Do we know who we are?  

Once we turn our lives over to God, we belong to Him. And from that very moment, our identity changes and we become new people (2 Corinthians 5:17, Ephesians 4:24). Sometimes just knowing who we are can make a difference in how we live our lives. Here is just a sampling of who we are:

  • We are God’s children (John 1:12).
  • We are loved (John 3:16).
  • We are Jesus’ friend (John 15:15).
  • We are accepted (Romans 15:7).
  • We are chosen (Ephesians 1:4).  
  • We are redeemed (Ephesians 1:7).
  • We are justified (Romans 3:24).
  • We are saved, not condemned (Romans 8:1).
  • We are free, not slaves (Romans 6:6).
  • We are heirs (Romans 8:17).
  • We are dwelling places for the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 6:19).
  • We are led by God (2 Corinthians 2:14).
  • We are righteous (2 Corinthians 2:15).
  • We are blessed (Ephesians 1:3).
  • We are alive in Christ (Ephesians 1:4-5).
  • We are complete in Christ (Colossians 2:10).

Our identity is now in Christ. All these attributes are who we are in Christ, not earned by us but freely given. The Bible says as a man thinks, so he is (Proverbs 23:7). How we perceive ourselves makes a difference in how we act, how we react, and how we live.

So who do you think you are? We can’t afford to get caught up in who others might think we are. We have an abundant life and rich inheritance. After all, we are God’s children!  

*****

“Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.” ~Philippians 4:8 (KJV)


Quench Your Thirst

July 25, 2021 in Uncategorized | Comments (0)

image_pdfimage_print

Think on These Things: Positive thoughts in a negative world…

In ancient times, every drop of water used in a household had to be carried from the local well. So each day women walked to the well, filled their heavy earthenware jars, and carried the water home. In John 4, we learn about the Samaritan woman coming to the local well and meeting Jesus.

At the well, she and Jesus started talking. She was surprised that Jesus knew so much about her. Then Jesus used the water of the well as a metaphor to teach this woman about the living water, that divine grace that gives eternal life. After chatting a little longer, she realized that Jesus is the living water.

The Samaritan woman came to the well because she was thirsty. She was thirsty for so much more than a cool drink of water, but probably didn’t know it. We need to come to the well and meet Jesus, too, because we get thirsty. Before we know it, we can be parched and dry. We need that living water or we will perish.

Psalm 42:1-2 says, “As the deer panteth for the water so my soul pants for you, O God. My soul thirsts for God, for the living God.”

When we read this scripture, we may picture a deer seeking a little refreshing cool drink of water. But that’s not what David meant by these verses. By the time a deer is so thirsty to be panting for water, he must have water or die. In this analogy, David is speaking of his desire for God being as essential to his life as air or water. When we don’t have enough of God, we despair and feel hopeless. Perhaps that’s why the thirsty deer was a symbol used by the early church to denote a Christian’s passion for God. 

Some of us come to the well because although we may not feel thirsty, we know we need to drink the water. You might say, “How could you not know you are thirsty?”

It happens all the time in life. People stay out in the sun too long and get dehydrated. They feel sick and don’t know why. Then someone says, “Have you been drinking water?” They think and respond with, “Why no, I haven’t!” They drink water and feel better.

Others can’t even tell when they are thirsty. In nursing homes, they are always making sure the elderly drink water because they can’t depend on their body signals to let them know they need it. Spiritually, some of us are the same way.

If we daily commune with God and drink of Jesus’ thirst-quenching water, we will never have to worry about being thirsty again.

*****

“Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.” ~Philippians 4:8 (KJV)


Hope

July 18, 2021 in Uncategorized | Comments (0)

image_pdfimage_print

Think on These Things: Positive thoughts in a negative world…

1 Corinthians 13:13 tells us hope is one of the big three Christian principles: faith, hope, and love. Just as faith and love are important in our Christian journey, so is hope.  

When the world thinks of hope they usually associate it with wishful thinking. Those who don’t have much money hope to win the lottery. Some who want success hope their ships will come in. However, hope from a spiritual perspective is not wishful thinking.

The Old Testament word for hope is “yachal” which means to wait, be patient. The Greek word for hope in the New Testament is “elpis” which means favorable and confident expectation. So when we are hopeful, we aren’t just waiting. We are confident our wait will reap positive results.

Believe it or not, hope is as necessary to the human spirit as oxygen is to the physical body. When we lose hope we are overcome with despair and lack of purpose. Without hope we lose all desire to go on. Our problems overwhelm us. Not having hope can literally destroy our lives.

Hope can save us from despair, but it is not something we can see with the human eye (Romans 8:24-25). The only way we see hope is through those who live it. In other words, hope is not held in our hands, only in our hearts.

Hope is not something that magically appears. It comes from Christ living in us (Colossians 1:27). Christ is our hope (1 Timothy 1:1). Our hope is connected with our relationship with God.

Without hope, our lives are joyless and full of despair. Without hope, our endurance dwindles and we feel like we can’t go on. There is a lot of pain, tragedy, trauma, and suffering in this world and those without Christ in their lives feel everything is hopeless (Ephesians 2:12). They don’t understand that problems in this world are only temporary. God says even death is temporary, so He doesn’t want us to sorrow like people who have no hope (I Thessalonians 4:13).  

Those who have Christ living in them do not need to feel hopeless. When Jesus died and was resurrected, we were begotten into a living hope (1 Peter 1:3-5). We have an inheritance that will not fade away. Our hope is blessed assurance that everything God has told us is true. We know salvation is a done deal. We don’t have to wonder about it. We don’t have to doubt it. We can be confident about that! Everything God promised us is true and God cannot lie (Titus 1:2).  

 

The Bible describes hope as a strong and trustworthy anchor for our souls (Hebrews 6:18-19). What does an anchor do? When a boat drifts a little this way or that way, the anchor tugs it back and keeps it centered. Hope keeps us centered on God so we don’t drift away. Hope is vital to the Christian life.

*****

“Now may the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in Him, that you may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.” ~Romans 15:13